Kimel Brent

Obituary of Kimel K. Brent

Kimel Klein Brent, the fourth son and the sixth of seven children born to Shelah Harrison Brent and Hassie Mae (Taylor) Brent, was born February 2, 1925 on a farm near Stafford, Kansas. After two years the family moved to another farm near ensign, KS and on to Colorado in June, 1931, where they settled near the Arickaree River north of Bovina, on the Jacob Miller Place. Kimel attended a country school, The Lincoln School Dist. 27, for his first ten years, then he and his sister Evelyn moved to Denver to live with their brother Herbert and wife Doris, and other relatives, where he graduated in 1943 from East High School. After high school he and several other chums decided to join the Merchant Marines, but he was rejected due to having had rheumatic fever when younger, so he then enlisted in the U.S. Navy in Denver, January, 1944 and was sent to Farragut, Idaho Naval Training Station for six weeks basic training. After returning to Farragut from a two-week leave at home he was immediately hospitalized with recurring rheumatic fever. It was strict bedrest for six weeks, then sent to Balboa Park Naval Hospital, San Diego, for another two months to recuperate. Upon returning to Farragut, he was sent on the train to Camp Parks, California, and was told “you’re in the Seabees now!”, which is construction battalion of the U.S. Navy: WE BUILD, WE FIGHT –CAN DO! After a few months at Camp Parks, CBMU 620, boarded ship General House and they sailed for the Hawaiian Islands for a few months of bivouce training. “While the group was being sent in on a convoy to the island of Iwo Jima in March, 1945, on a Dutch ship, the Bosch Fontaine, (on loan from Holland during the war emergency,), a Japanese submarine was spotted. The captain of the ship said “I think we can out-run that submarine”, so they left the convoy and headed for Truk Island, and made it safely. They then arrived at Saipan where they anchored for a short time, and upon preparing to leave, the anchor was caught on the coral reef on the bottom of the ocean, so after trying several times to raise the anchor, the brake on the winch didn’t hold, and there was a terrible roar as all of the chain went to the bottom of the ocean. They then sailed for Iwo Jima, arriving there the end of March 1945. They climbed over the side of the ship onto the cargo nets, with their sea bags and M1 carbines, loaded into an LST, (Landing Ship Tank), and were unloaded on the beach where they waded ashore, dig holes in the black sand and spent the night. Later they slept in two-man tents with their heads out of the tents. Some of the Japanese enemy slipped into another Army camp on the island, and slit the throats of some black allied soldiers. After that they were instructed to sleep with their heads in the tents and feet out. They had P-51 Mustangs stationed on Iwo Jima to fight off the Japanese and to escort the B-29s back to home base Guam. Many mornings he was awakened by the P-51s taking off, flying right over his tent. After arriving on the Island Kimel’s job was working on trucks, driving trucks and pumping sea water up to some storage tanks to distill for drinking. After awhile he could tell Japanese planes from American planes by the sound of the engines. They were bombed three times, but had no casualties. Their assignment was to build airfields to enable B-29’s and crewmen were saved by being able to land on Iwo. After a year on Iwo, Kimel was flown to Japan on a C-47, stayed a day or two, then boarded a ship, the Oneida, and arrived in California in May, 1946, to be discharged at Treasure Island, CA., with the rating of M M 3/c (Machinist Mate 3rd Class).” He returned to Denver and on home to Bovina to farm with his father, S.H. Brent, as well as his brother Kermit, custom combining in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, North and South Dakota, where he used his new International truck which he had purchased with his military pay. While visiting in Denver one week-end, he met his future wife, Wanda, at church one Sunday evening in February 1948. She was attending nursing school at St. Luke’s Hospital, and they were married on September 12, 1948 at The First United Methodist Church at Pierce, CO. They lived in Denver for two years where he had a mechanic’s job, and also operated a garage with his brother, Herbert, the couple returned to eastern Colorado to farm with his father. The couple was blessed with four sons: Balyn, Terrell, Ralph and Nelson. In 1961 they moved to a farm near Arriba, and in 1962 they moved to the present location that they purchased from Alfred Bitterly. In 1978-81 the couple went to Denver so Wanda could get her R.N. degree, Kimel continued to farm as his age allowed him to do. Kimel and Wanda went with a Christian missions group to Central America on three short-term medical mission trips. Kimel and Wanda became very interested and involved in the WWII Iwo Jima survivor reunions in San Diego, California and Wichita Falls, Texas. He was also very instrumental in planning, organizing and participating in the Memorial Day Service at the Arriba Cemetary for many years. Kimel had a collection of old cars, trucks and tractors which he enjoyed. He also had extreme knowledge of vehicles, trucks and tractors over the decades, which he shared with his sons. He often commented on the Memorial Day flood in 1935 when flood waters flowed over the top of the bridge on the Arickaree River east of the Miller home place, and also the ’46 blizzard when three feet of snow fell, blocking the roads, and the family truck remained stuck for three weeks in the middle of the road about half a mile from home until they could dig it out. He also had an interest in steam and steam tractors. He was thrilled when his 1912 Case steam tractor came to life with repair, hard work, muscle, sweat and energy at the Thresher Show in Bird City, Kansas. He had extreme knowledge and interest in cars, trucks and tractors from his earliest automobiles of 1919 to present vehicles. By God's grace, Kimel saw his need for salvation which is Jesus Christ. He then accepted Jesus Christ as his personal Saviour. Later on he rededicated his life to the Lord and was baptized, when a traveling evangelist came to Bethel Church. He enjoyed having his daily devotions, reading his bible, and praying, which the Lord guided him through his many years. His favorite verses were John 3: 16-21. After the death of his wife, Wanda, of 71 years, he continued to live by himself on the farm until July 2020. After celebrating his 95th birthday in February 2020, he and Ralph flew to Washington D.C. for the 75th Anniversary of the Battle for Iwo Jima with 52 survivors attending. They took part in tours, visiting the National Museum Marine Corp., the Iwo Jima Memorial, the National Air and Space Museum where Kimel saw the Enola Gay and once again the P-51 Mustang fighter planes which he was very familiar with while on Iwo Jima serving his country as a Seabee. Kimel celebrated his 96th birthday last February and really looked forward to going one last time to the Thresher Show in Bird City, Kansas, which he did attend. He was preceded in death by his wife, Wanda of 71 years, his brothers Ralph , Herbert, and Kermit. Sisters Irene and Dessie and spouses. Son, Balyn Brent and his first wife Vicki and infant son, Aaron. Nephews, Donnie Christensen, Steve Christensen, and Ronald Brent. Nieces, Elizabeth Brent and Dessie Bob Taylor. He is survived by one sister Evelyn of Portland, Oregon, one daughter – in- law Linda, and three sons and wives: Terrell (Patty) of Palm City, Florida, Ralph (Dawn) of Genoa, Colorado, and Nelson (Carol) of Akron, Colorado. He is survived by many grandchildren, and numerous great-grandchildren, also nieces, nephews, cousins and many friends. As the end of life on earth drew near for him, he verbally expressed anticipation of his new home in heaven with Jesus Christ his Savior, and seeing his bride, Wanda. Even though he was a quiet and reserved man, his faith in Jesus was deep and prayer was a very important part of every day. He was a humble man and did not want to be in the forefront or attention on himself, but thought of others first.
To plant a tree in memory of Kimel Brent, please visit Tribute Store
Monday
3
January

Visitation

9:00 am - 9:50 am
Monday, January 3, 2022
Bethel Church of the Brethren
62919 County Road 63
Arriba, Colorado, United States
Monday
3
January

Funeral Service

10:00 am - 11:00 am
Monday, January 3, 2022
Bethel Church of the Brethren
62919 County Road 63
Arriba, Colorado, United States
Monday
3
January

Interment

11:15 am - 12:00 pm
Monday, January 3, 2022
Arriba Cemetery
Rd 42
Arriba, Colorado, United States
Share Your Memory of
Kimel